Success Tips

15 Best Tips For Running Successful Trial Periods For New Hires

Written by admin

A bad hire can not only have devastating effects on team productivity and morale, it can also cost a business thousands of dollars.

Reputed recruiter Jörgen Sundberg estimates that onboarding costs for a new employee are roughly $240,000, while U.S. Department of Labor figures put the cost of a bad hire at 30% of the employee’s first-year earnings. So how can a business avoid such expenses and make sure that it invests in the right person?

One way to reduce the risk of making a bad hire is to offer paid trial periods. A probation period lasts typically 90 days and can benefit both employer and employee — at the end of the trial, you can decide whether that person is someone you want on your team permanently, and the employee can determine whether your business is a good fit for them.

Below, 15 entrepreneurs from Young Entrepreneur Council discuss the best ways a business can run a successful trial period in order to find the most suitable candidate. Here is what they had to say:

All photos courtesy of individual YEC members.

YEC members offer tips regarding trial periods for new hires.

1. Give a Specific Project/Piece of Work

We make it very clear up front what the piece of work is, what success looks like, and that the potential new hire is responsible for the outcome. Aside from being able to evaluate the new hire on their proficiency/job-specific skill set, it allows us to evaluate a number of other skills, such as ownership and mastery.- Diana Goodwin, AquaMobile

2. Set Clear Expectations

All our new hires know just what we expect of them based on their role and team early in the process. We start by relying on a mentorship program, where new hires get to know how we operate, and this lasts for a few days or weeks. A brief period of formal training follows, and they get to work on real client projects soon after. One-on-one checkpoints happen monthly, for the first six months.- Derek Robinson, Top Notch Dezigns

3. Determine Whether They Can Sell

It may sound silly, but everyone that works within my SaaS firm sells the software. Why? Because we want to make sure everyone knows everything there is to know about our product, our processes, and the people who make it work. Not only do all team members have to sell, they do it on commission only, and have goals they need to reach if they want the salary that will come along with the job.- Jason Criddle, Jason Criddle and Associates

4. Give Them Resources and a Mentor

First, we make sure to give new hires the necessary resources to succeed, outline what we expect them to do, and when we want projects completed. Transparency, openness, and communication are cornerstones to successfully onboarding new hires. We also match employees with mentors, so they have a go-to for questions and concerns. Finally, we have weekly meetings to discuss what is and isn’t working.- Blair Thomas, eMerchantBroker

5. Hire Them Part Time

Before you commit to bringing them on as a permanent hire, hire them part time. Have them work on a project or two in their spare time while they maintain their existing day job. This minimizes the risk for both parties, since the potential hire can explore what it’s like to work with you before they quit their old job, and you can clearly see how well they apply their skills to your business.- Firas Kittaneh, Amerisleep

6. Make It an Internship or Freelance Role

Only take on new hires as part of an internship-style role or as a freelancer. This provides a much more comfortable trial period for both you and the potential new hire. If they are truly interested, they will accept this arrangement with an agreement form in place to come on full board if it works out.- Drew Hendricks, Buttercup

7. Offer Apprenticeships for Entry-Level Employees

Last year we started offering a role called an “apprenticeship,” where recent college grads spend six months with us in a trial period. Over the course of those six months, we expose apprentices to different parts of our business to gauge their talent and fit, and if they’ve excelled in a certain discipline, we give them a full-time offer once their trial period is complete.- Kevin Yamazaki, Sidebench

“>

A bad hire can not only have devastating effects on team productivity and morale, it can also cost a business thousands of dollars.

Reputed recruiter Jörgen Sundberg estimates that onboarding costs for a new employee are roughly $240,000, while U.S. Department of Labor figures put the cost of a bad hire at 30% of the employee’s first-year earnings. So how can a business avoid such expenses and make sure that it invests in the right person?

One way to reduce the risk of making a bad hire is to offer paid trial periods. A probation period lasts typically 90 days and can benefit both employer and employee — at the end of the trial, you can decide whether that person is someone you want on your team permanently, and the employee can determine whether your business is a good fit for them.

Below, 15 entrepreneurs from Young Entrepreneur Council discuss the best ways a business can run a successful trial period in order to find the most suitable candidate. Here is what they had to say:

All photos courtesy of individual YEC members.

YEC members offer tips regarding trial periods for new hires.

1. Give a Specific Project/Piece of Work

We make it very clear up front what the piece of work is, what success looks like, and that the potential new hire is responsible for the outcome. Aside from being able to evaluate the new hire on their proficiency/job-specific skill set, it allows us to evaluate a number of other skills, such as ownership and mastery.- Diana Goodwin, AquaMobile

2. Set Clear Expectations

All our new hires know just what we expect of them based on their role and team early in the process. We start by relying on a mentorship program, where new hires get to know how we operate, and this lasts for a few days or weeks. A brief period of formal training follows, and they get to work on real client projects soon after. One-on-one checkpoints happen monthly, for the first six months.- Derek Robinson, Top Notch Dezigns

3. Determine Whether They Can Sell

It may sound silly, but everyone that works within my SaaS firm sells the software. Why? Because we want to make sure everyone knows everything there is to know about our product, our processes, and the people who make it work. Not only do all team members have to sell, they do it on commission only, and have goals they need to reach if they want the salary that will come along with the job.- Jason Criddle, Jason Criddle and Associates

4. Give Them Resources and a Mentor

First, we make sure to give new hires the necessary resources to succeed, outline what we expect them to do, and when we want projects completed. Transparency, openness, and communication are cornerstones to successfully onboarding new hires. We also match employees with mentors, so they have a go-to for questions and concerns. Finally, we have weekly meetings to discuss what is and isn’t working.- Blair Thomas, eMerchantBroker

5. Hire Them Part Time

Before you commit to bringing them on as a permanent hire, hire them part time. Have them work on a project or two in their spare time while they maintain their existing day job. This minimizes the risk for both parties, since the potential hire can explore what it’s like to work with you before they quit their old job, and you can clearly see how well they apply their skills to your business.- Firas Kittaneh, Amerisleep

6. Make It an Internship or Freelance Role

Only take on new hires as part of an internship-style role or as a freelancer. This provides a much more comfortable trial period for both you and the potential new hire. If they are truly interested, they will accept this arrangement with an agreement form in place to come on full board if it works out.- Drew Hendricks, Buttercup

7. Offer Apprenticeships for Entry-Level Employees

Last year we started offering a role called an “apprenticeship,” where recent college grads spend six months with us in a trial period. Over the course of those six months, we expose apprentices to different parts of our business to gauge their talent and fit, and if they’ve excelled in a certain discipline, we give them a full-time offer once their trial period is complete.- Kevin Yamazaki, Sidebench

Let’s block ads! (Why?)


Source link

About the author

admin

Leave a Comment